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MISSION NUESTRA SEÑORA DE LA SOLEDAD

Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad Paper Model. Perfect for School Projects A+.

Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad Model Project

Build this 3D paper model replica of Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad. Perfect for school projects! All you have to do is cut, glue and assemble this mission into a beautify 3D replica. Printed on thick card heavy duty stock paper. 

Two Ways to Order!

1. Buy now on Amazon. Two options to choose from. Mission Large Model Only and Deluxe Set (includes mission accessories).

Deluxe Set (Most Popular)
Includes Mission Accessories
Church Only
Large Size Mission Model
Mission Nuestra Senora De La Soledad Model Deluxe Set
Mission Nuestra Senora De La Soledad Model Only
Buy Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad on Amazon
Buy Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad on Amazon

 

2. Purchase a Mega Deluxe Set downloadable online now.

Get instant access. You will receive multiple pdf files where you can print on your own color printer. The Mega Deluxe Set comes with everything you see below. This is not available on Amazon. You will get the Large Mission Model, The Extra Annex Building, The Mission Accessories and the Project Board Mega Pack. 

Mission Model Size

Large Size Base:

  • Width: 10 inches
  • Length: 13 inches
  • Height: 5.1 inches

History of Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad

While the thirteenth mission was ultimately not successful, Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad has an interesting history that is unique compared to other California missions. The decision to place a mission in the Salinas Valley was made way back in 1771 by Padre Junipero Serra. Padre Serra founded the first nine missions in California and while he didn’t live to see Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad built, his successor, Padre Fermin Lasuen, not only did, but also oversaw its founding on October 9, 1791.

The location for the thirteenth mission was unusual because it had poor soil and strong winds which made the area very cold at night and in the winter. The Spanish even named the area Soledad which means loneliness to describe the feeling the Spanish explorers experienced there. The thirteenth mission was called Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad which means “Our Lady of Solitude” and was inspired by the name the Spanish explorers gave the area.

Despite rough conditions, the new mission was built near a small Esselen village called “Chuttusgellis.” Since the Padres main goal for each mission was to try and educate as many Native Americans about Christianity as possible and perform baptisms. Building the new mission was slow, because the Esselen population near Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad was small.

By the time the church finished in 1796, an irrigation system had been built and the mission already had farms established to grow food. The Padres and Esselen were also able to turn the bad soil into productive farms which grew corn, wheat, and grapes. There were also over 5,000 animals like cows, sheep, and horses being raised at the mission.

At its peak, Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad had a population of only 700 Esselen in 1905. While this number is quite a bit lower than other missions, when the overall low Native American population in that area is considered, this is an accomplishment. The mission also performed 2,000 baptisms which compares well with the more successful missions in California.

While Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad was successful baptizing Esselen and growing food early on, a number of problems occurred. The first was the extreme weather which damaged the buildings at the mission. In the summer, it was so hot and dry that buildings would crack and fall apart and in the winter, it was too wet and would cause adobe walls to turn into mud and fall apart. The mission was also built on a plain not far from the Salinas River which often flooded. Another big problem was that the Padres themselves found the mission to be a miserable place to live because it was often cold and wet.

Many Padres asked to be moved somewhere else within a year of service which made it hard to keep the mission running. In fact, so many Padres requested to leave the mission that there was eventually only a single Padre left at the mission. Padre Vicente Francisco De Sarría stayed at the mission when nobody else would and continued working until May, 1835 when he passed away on the altar. Members of the Esselen tribe discovered his body and carried him to Mission San Antonio de Padua to be buried.

As time went on, Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad’s population started to dwindle. European diseases that were brought to California by the Spanish hit the Esselen hard and when many started dying, healthy Esselen fled the mission to try and protect themselves.

Padre Sarría was barely keeping Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad going and when he died, the mission fell apart. After Padre Sarría’s death, not only was the Mexican government selling off the mission lands to settlers at this time, but nobody took care of the gardens or buildings at the mission and so they were quickly ruined.

The ruins of the mission would continue to be neglected all the way until 1954 when a group called the Native Daughters of Golden West decided that Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad should be rebuilt. A small chapel was built from adobe bricks and eventually, gardens were also added around the mission to make the area even more beautiful. Inside the chapel, visitors can see what is left of the original foundation of the old mission and items from the 1700 and 1800’s are also displayed inside. Mission Nuestra Señora Dolorosísima de la Soledad is still located in a lonely part of California where not many people live, but if you are willing to make the trip, you can experience the conditions that challenged so many Padres and Esselen in California’s early history.